IS 45 THE NEW 50? WHEN SHOULD YOU GET SCREENED FOR COLON CANCER?

The American Cancer Society lowered its recommended colon cancer screening age from 50 to 45 last year. Today, young-onset colorectal cancer survivor and business leader, Scott Wilson, is leading efforts in Colorado to mandate this age reduction and require insurance companies to cover colonoscopy costs beginning at age 45. The facts are that there is an ever-increasing number of cases of colorectal cancer in younger individuals. It’s not known why.

The likelihood of someone born in 1990 developing colorectal cancer has doubled

Wilson, who heads corporate affairs at Molson Coors Brewing Company, was diagnosed with Stage IV metastatic colon cancer at 48. Treatment has included colon and liver surgeries, 40 weeks of aggressive chemotherapy, and ongoing surveillance. He serves on the national board of the Washington, D.C., based Colorectal Cancer Alliance and Never Too Young Advisory Board, and is an integral part of the Blue Hope Bash and Denver Undy RunWalk. In addition, Scott authored the photo book Through the Window—A Photographic Tale of Cancer Recovery (https://www.ccalliance.org/shop/books/through-the-window) that depicts his journey to recovery over cancer. All proceeds are donated to the Colorectal Cancer Alliance.

Scott recently presented before state legislators to garner support for a 2020 bill to reduce Colorado’s covered average risk screening age for colorectal cancer to 45, in line with American Cancer Society guidelines. The bill already has two primary sponsors. With his permission, we are pleased to share his Colorado Cancer Coalition presentation with you.

Click Here to View The Presentation

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Please read our latest blog.

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ANAL WARTS (CONDYLOMA) – Causes, Symptoms & Diagnosis

Cycling and Hemorrhoids… Is there a connection?

Creative common How I bike from Presurfer from office.com copyright cc 2011

The amazing trails and panoramic views of the Rocky Mountains make Colorado one of the best places in the country for cycling enthusiasts. It is more of an anomaly to not have a bike here than to have one. It is a great exercise for most age groups and a way of life for many. But are there any side effects to our backsides when sitting on a bike?

Many people indirectly link cycling to hemorrhoids but in fact, riding a bike does not cause hemorrhoids. It can, however, exacerbate them.

It seems obvious that sitting on a somewhat hard bike seat for extended periods of time with hemorrhoids would be quite unpleasant. The friction of repetitive motion while rubbing near your anus certainly would not feel great on flared up hemorrhoids. Ouch! The good news is most hemorrhoids will resolve in a few days…but not if you continue to cycle. Unfortunately, for those avid cyclists out there, you may have to stop biking to allow those pesky hemorrhoids to heal.

Many cyclists will ask: Are there any cycling bike seats that may help ease the pain of hemorrhoids?

Although our medical expertise lies within the buttocks area, we can’t recommend the best bike seats for cyclists as it is not really the cause or solution for hemorrhoids. There certainly may be some relief from a softer seat but it is best to speak with your local cycling shop to inquire about various seat options. We can ensure that a seat itself will not solve your hemorrhoid problem. The best thing to do is to try to prevent them from happening in the first place…

How can we prevent hemorrhoids?

The best precaution for limiting hemorrhoids is diet. Eat more fiber and drink lots of water. The goal is to increase motion in your intestinal track so you don’t become constipated and strain during bowel movements, which is the most common cause of hemorrhoid problems.

What exactly is a hemorrhoid?

Well, there are several different variations of hemorrhoids. The Mayo Clinic defines the 3 types of hemorrhoids as follows:

  • Internal hemorrhoids: These lie inside the rectum. You usually can’t see or feel these hemorrhoids, and they rarely cause discomfort. But straining or irritation when passing stool can damage a hemorrhoid’s surface and cause it to bleed.
  • External hemorrhoids: These are under the skin around your anus. When irritated, external hemorrhoids can itch or swell.
  • Thrombosed hemorrhoids: Sometimes blood may pool in an external hemorrhoid and form a clot (thrombus) that can result in severe pain, swelling, inflammation and a hard lump near your anus.

For symptoms of internal and external hemorrhoids, see the hemorrhoid section on our website at: https://coloradocolonandrectalspecialists.com/hemorrhoids-treatment/

As we have learned, cycling does not cause hemorrhoids but it certainly isn’t the best practice if you are currently experiencing them. Because cycling can irritate hemorrhoids and cause more pain and swelling in the affected area, you may have to take a break –just for a little bit– while your hemorrhoids subside. If halting your passion for a short time is not an option for you, we recommend you seek treatment for your hemorrhoids with Dr. Lisa Perryman. Call us at 303-840-8822 to schedule your appointment.

Even with hemorrhoids, we still recommend exercising. Maybe take a hike just not your bike.

Congratulations, it’s a GIRL… and a pregnancy Hemorrhoid!

Copyright © 2019, Gray Space www.grayspacefl.com.  Artist Debbie Draws Funny.

Growing a human being is undoubtedly a wonder, but for many women, it certainly has its downsides. When pregnant, there is a lot of commiserating about the ailments that come along with pregnancy; nausea, fatigue, weight gain, etc. Comparing stories about pregnancy and labor is a form of nostalgia for most women. The conversation usually ends with don’t worry, it is all worth it once you hold your beautiful baby. Although that may be true, we don’t tend to reminisce about pregnancy hemorrhoids. Who really likes to talk about their backsides anyway? Fortunately, here at Dr. Perryman’s office, we do. We know how important it is to maintain a healthy hiney! We talk about hemorrhoids on a daily basis and there is nothing to be embarrassed about. We all have butts and most likely you or someone you know has suffered hemorrhoids during pregnancy.

You are not alone!

Did you know that according to the NIH (National Institutes of Health) up to 35 percent of pregnant women will suffer from pregnancy hemorrhoids? During pregnancy, increased progesterone levels can cause constipation in expecting mothers, particularly in the 3rd trimester of pregnancy.  The increase in progesterone cause the walls of the veins to relax, which increases swelling.  This combination of constipation, swelling and a growing uterus adds pressure to the inferior vena cava and hemorrhoids can become a common and quite unpleasant side effect of pregnancy. During labor, all that pushing and pressure can also cause a hemorrhoid to flare up.  So, while giving birth is magical, it can also be a serious pain in the bottom.

If you experience painful bowel movements, swelling near your anus, notice blood in the toilet or when you wipe, you might have hemorrhoids.  It is important to note, however, that although hemorrhoids are usually the cause of rectal bleeding, it’s not the only cause. A board-certified colon & rectal medical doctor should be seen to properly diagnosis your condition.

What can you do to treat hemorrhoids during pregnancy?

Here are recommendations from the American Pregnancy Association that can potentially help reduce pregnancy hemorrhoid symptoms:

  • Increase your dietary fiber and liquid intake
  • Ask your physician about a stool softener
  • Stay active. Don’t sit for too long
  • Take a warm bath
  • Use witch hazel to reduce swelling or bleeding

If you are suffering from hemorrhoids after pregnancy, focus on these same measures to relieve your hemorrhoids, as well. These conservative methods can help alleviate symptoms in most patients. If the hemorrhoid symptoms persist, you should see a board certified colon and rectal specialist to prevent more serious complications like painful thrombosis and prolapse of the hemorrhoid.

For more information on hemorrhoid types and treatments, visit our Web site’s section on hemorrhoids at: https://coloradocolonandrectalspecialists.com/hemorrhoids-treatment/.

You just created life, you should be able to enjoy your own. Speak up, tell us about your hemorrhoids and also, congrats on that baby!

Weightlifters and Hemorrhoids

When it comes to fitness and health, lifting weights regularly paired with good nutrition can create lasting results. Being dedicated to this method of exercise can benefit our entire mind, body and spiritual health. It can control body weight issues, keep us focused and relaxed, and make us strong. Sounds pretty positive, right? Sure, but are there any negatives to lifting weights?

Lifting Weights Can Lead to Hemorrhoids

Incorrect movement can cause injury and unnecessary pain. Regularly lifting heavy objects that our bodies can’t handle may lead to obvious pulled muscles and aching bones. There’s also something else that most of us don’t like to talk about. Hemorrhoids! Yup, those pesky “piles” that come with unpleasant circumstances (bleeding, itching, pain) can be caused by improper weight lifting.

How Hemorrhoids Develop from Lifting Heavy Objects

Weight lifting itself isn’t the cause of hemorrhoids – they are a result of poor technique! It is more difficult than we think to lift weights correctly. People frequently hold their breath and strain as they lift heavy weights. Holding your breath and grunting (you know, you’ve heard that person at the gym) will force the air down into your lungs while increasing the pressure on your internal organs, thus creating the veins near your rectum to swell into hemorrhoids.

The process of creating unwanted pressure in your abdomen is similar to the strain you may have experienced when trying to have an uneasy bowel movement (which is also one of the most common causes of hemorrhoids). This lack of proper breathing can happen when lifting heavy objects in your everyday life, too, not necessarily barbells or weights, but a piece of furniture perhaps. Sometimes we think we can handle more weight than our body can, which can cause the straining mentioned above.

How to Prevent Hemorrhoids When Lifting Weights–Just Breathe!

Learning how to breathe properly during weight training is very important in reducing the risk of hemorrhoids. Certified personal trainers and exercise professionals are trained on the mechanics of proper breathing during exercise, so make sure you ask a professional. If you lift on your own, or have already been educated on these breathing methods, remember to consistently inhale and exhale. We often take for granted the power of a simple breath.  

So, 1) don’t think you’re Hercules, and 2) breathe when lifting something heavy.

Can I lift weights with hemorrhoids?

If you are currently experiencing painful hemorrhoids, weight lifting is not recommended.

Lifting with hemorrhoids will only prolong the healing process, and can make those bothersome hemorrhoids worse. However, other exercise such as walking, stretching, or even a yoga class may even relieve some of the symptoms.

Anytime you have bleeding, feel a lump in the anal area, or have rectal pain you should see a colorectal specialist to rule out a more serious condition. More than likely these issues are symptomatic to hemorrhoids, but it is always good to check with your doctor. If you have already been diagnosed with hemorrhoids, and your symptoms are lingering–schedule an appointment.  

What are hemorrhoids? What are the symptoms? When should you see a colorectal specialist?

Hemorrhoids are enlarged blood vessels in and around the anus and lower rectum. Hemorrhoids may be internal or external. Symptoms include:

  • Bleeding during bowel movements
  • Protrusion of skin around the anus during bowel movements
  • Itching in the anal area
  • Pain in the anal area
  • Sensitive lump(s)

For more detailed information on hemorrhoids go to: https://coloradocolonandrectalspecialists.com/ hemorrhoids-treatment/.

Caring for Hemorrhoids at Home

Although hemorrhoids will never go away on their own completely, you might try some of these tips at home to reduce inflammation and provide temporary pain relief:

    • Sit in a tub of warm water for 15 minutes at a time.
    • Wrap a cold pack with a towel. Carefully sit on it for 20 minutes at a time to reduce hemorrhoidal inflammation.
    • Don’t strain or sit on the toilet for too long. This puts more pressure on the area and can increase pain.

If the above measures aren’t working for you and those unwanted hemorrhoids rear their ugly heads (pun intended), Dr. Perryman is here to discuss personalized treatment options while making you more comfortable to live your life as YOU want to!

 

For now, keep your squats low, your standards high, and remember to always BREATHE!

Contact Dr. Lisa A. Perryman, board certified colon & rectal surgeon at (303)840-8822, or request an appointment on our contact page. 

Cologuard vs Colonoscopy – Which is Better?

Running with Hemorrhoids [Those irritating, painful, often bloody annoyances that can make marathon running less enjoyable.]

What do Beijing, Berlin, Boston, Chicago, Dubai, Gold Coast, London, NYC, Prague, and Tokyo have in common? In addition to being home to the world’s top 10 marathons, they’re home to hemorrhoids….hundreds and hundreds of hemorrhoids.

Running with hemorrhoids can be a painful experience for some. Understanding what hemorrhoids are, and why running can increase your chances of getting them can help you find a solution that won’t keep you away from the finish line.

Important message to all sneaker jocks out there: Running in itself does not cause hemorrhoids.

What are hemorrhoids? They are cushions of vascular tissue in the anal canal, and can be very painful when they flare up. There are two kinds of hemorrhoids—internal and external. Few runners are aware that around 50 percent of adults have hemorrhoid symptoms. They can hurt, bleed, itch, and oftentimes are especially irritating for athletes. Although hemorrhoids are not generally life threatening, you should still see a colon & rectal specialist if you are experiencing bleeding to rule out serious illness, such as colon cancer.

Colon Cancer is the #2 cancer killer, yet it’s preventable.

What causes runners to have hemorrhoid symptoms? Increased pressure and engorgement of hemorrhoids can be the culprit. Marathon running stresses the gastrointestinal system, and runners often experience flatulence, runners’ diarrhea, excessive sweating, and other aggravations. Let’s be clear: running does not cause hemorrhoids. However, several dynamics associated with long distance running may trigger hemorrhoid symptoms—constipation is common with marathoners who tend to skimp on water consumption. This creates hard stool that makes straining in the bathroom a problem—hard stool puts pressure on the hemorrhoids during bowel movements and inflames this tissue.

Exercise actually offers therapeutic value to hemorrhoid sufferers because it increases intestinal muscle contractions. This can help promote regular, easier bowel movements. Exercise can also help you lose weight that may be contributing to your hemorrhoid symptoms.

If hemorrhoids are forcing you to consider hanging up your running shoes, consider staying better hydrated, increasing the fiber in your diet, and sitting in a warm bath several times daily.

Make an appointment with a board certified colon & rectal surgeon if these simple remedies don’t bring relief. They may suggest a painless rubber banding procedure that takes less than 10 minutes in the office. People with severe cases of hemorrhoids should consult their doctor before jogging and running to avoid a worsened condition, such as prolapse.


www.ColoradoColon.com