2019 Denver Undy Fun Run/Walk

B is for BEAT

E is for EARLY DETECTION

H is for HEALTHY HINEY

I is for INFORMATION

N is for NECESSARY

D is for DIAGNOSIS

What are the possible results after a colonoscopy?

Normal- No polyps were found in your colon and you’ll likely repeat a colonoscopy in 10 years, or sooner if there’s family history.

Benign Polyp- Polyps are noncancerous abnormal clumps of cells that form on the lining of the colon. They are removed during your colonoscopy, biopsied, and reviewed by a pathologist. You’ll likely be advised to repeat the colonoscopy in 3-5 years.
A benign (noncancerous) growth may be a precursor lesion to colorectal cancer. Polyps greater than one centimeter in diameter are associated with a greater risk of cancer. If certain types of polyps are not removed, they continue to grow and can become cancerous.

Malignant Tumor in the Colon (colon cancer)
• Stage 0 Cancer is at its earliest, most treatable stage. It is still restricted to the innermost lining of the colon.
• Stage 1 Cancer has begun to spread but is still in the inner lining.
• Stage 2 Cancer has grown through the colon wall and may extend into nearby tissue. It hasn’t yet spread to lymph nodes.
• Stage 3 Cancer has spread to the lymph nodes, but not other organs of the body.
• Stage 4 Cancer has spread to the lymph nodes and other parts of the body, most commonly lungs and liver. This is known as metastatic cancer.

B is for BEAT

E is for EARLY DETECTION

H is for HEALTHY HINEY

I is for INFORMATION

N is for NECESSARY

Why is colonoscopy so important?

COLONOSCOPY is the gold standard and the only way to PREVENT colon cancer. Other tests such as FIT, fecal occult blood and at-home stool samples only DETECT blood or abnormal DNA. They are not as specific or therapeutic as colonoscopy. Precancerous polyps or cancer can be missed if they weren’t bleeding when the test was done. Colonoscopy PREVENTS colon cancer by removing precancerous polyps during the procedure before they become cancerous.

B is for BEAT

E is for EARLY DETECTION

H is for HEALTHY HINEY

I is for INFORMATION

Get informed! What should you expect before, during, and after your colonoscopy?

Here are the basics…

PAINLESS- Yes, totally!

PREP- You’ll follow a low fiber diet the week prior to your colonoscopy and only consume clear liquids the day before. Based on your bowel habits, Dr. Perryman will prescribe a colon cleanser or give you directions for over the counter laxatives.

PROCEDURE - You’ll be administered IV sedation/analgesia (typically propofol) and be asleep throughout the procedure. This ensures you and your body are relaxed, which allows for optimal viewing of your colon. Dr. Perryman, board certified colon & rectal surgeon, will use a thin flexible tube with a camera and light at the end to examine the entire colon. The colonoscopy itself only takes 30 minutes and is totally painless. When you awaken, you’ll be hungry and slightly sleepy.

Rest, relax, and congratulate yourself on taking care of your BEHIND
B is for BEAT

E is for EARLY DETECTION

H is for THE HEALTHY HINEY

Follow us on Facebook for helpful info about colorectal cancer and other anorectal conditions including hemorrhoids.
https://www.facebook.com/TheHealthyHiney

B is for BEAT colon cancer

E is for EARLY DETECTION

If you’re at average risk for colorectal cancer, the American Cancer Society recommends you start regular screenings at age 45. If you’re at increased or high risk of colorectal cancer, you should begin preventative screenings before age 45 and be screened more often. High risk includes people with:
• Family history of colorectal cancer or polyps (mother, father, sibling)
• Personal history of colorectal cancer or polyps
• Personal history of inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease)
• African American ethnicity
• Family history of a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome such as familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) or Lynch syndrome (hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer)

Most insurance companies do not yet follow American Cancer Society guidelines. Currently, most consider 50 the standard age for colon cancer screening. The Colorado Cancer Coalition is currently urging state lawmakers to legislate that insurance companies adhere to the new recommendation and cover preventative screenings at 100% beginning age 45. Follow the fight at:

https://www.coloradocancercoalition.org/colorado-cancer-coalition-urges-lawmakers-to-tackle-young-onset-colorectal-cancer/
Colorado Cancer Coalition Urges Lawmakers to Tackle Young Onset Colorectal Cancer | Colorado Cancer ...
www.coloradocancercoalition.org
https://www.coloradocancercoalition.org/colorado-cancer-coalition-urges-lawmakers-to-tackle-young-on...

Congratulations to Dr. Perryman – 2017 United Healthcare Premium Care Physician

United Healthcare has awarded Lisa A. Perryman, MD, FACS, FASCRS, its 2017 Premium Care Physician designation for providing quality and cost-efficient care. Dr. Perryman is a board-certified colon and rectal surgeon serving patients throughout the Denver metro area. The UnitedHealth Premium program helps members make informed choices for their medical care. Premium Care Physician is UnitedHealthcare’s highest physician designation. Dr. Perryman specializes in cancer prevention colonoscopies, hemorrhoid treatments, and other colorectal conditions.

Colon Health and Your Diet

Foods for colon health

Start the New Year off right by improving your colon health through eating a healthy diet. The World Health Organization (WHO) recently published research linking red meat and processed meat to colon cancer.  Decreasing the amount of processed meat in your diet may reduce your risk of developing colon cancer. Make an effort to increase your intake of fiber, lean protein, and healthy fats. These diet modifications will also help you control your weight. Maintaining a healthy weight is beneficial to your colon health. A well-rounded diet in addition to routine screenings, such as colonoscopies is essential to lowering your risk of developing colon cancer.

Take control of your health this year!

Click the Q&A link below to learn more:

Q&A: Processed Meat and Colon Cancer