Cycling and Hemorrhoids… Is there a connection?

Creative common How I bike from Presurfer from office.com copyright cc 2011

The amazing trails and panoramic views of the Rocky Mountains make Colorado one of the best places in the country for cycling enthusiasts. It is more of an anomaly to not have a bike here than to have one. It is a great exercise for most age groups and a way of life for many. But are there any side effects to our backsides when sitting on a bike?

Many people indirectly link cycling to hemorrhoids but in fact, riding a bike does not cause hemorrhoids. It can, however, exacerbate them.

It seems obvious that sitting on a somewhat hard bike seat for extended periods of time with hemorrhoids would be quite unpleasant. The friction of repetitive motion while rubbing near your anus certainly would not feel great on flared up hemorrhoids. Ouch! The good news is most hemorrhoids will resolve in a few days…but not if you continue to cycle. Unfortunately, for those avid cyclists out there, you may have to stop biking to allow those pesky hemorrhoids to heal.

Many cyclists will ask: Are there any cycling bike seats that may help ease the pain of hemorrhoids?

Although our medical expertise lies within the buttocks area, we can’t recommend the best bike seats for cyclists as it is not really the cause or solution for hemorrhoids. There certainly may be some relief from a softer seat but it is best to speak with your local cycling shop to inquire about various seat options. We can ensure that a seat itself will not solve your hemorrhoid problem. The best thing to do is to try to prevent them from happening in the first place…

How can we prevent hemorrhoids?

The best precaution for limiting hemorrhoids is diet. Eat more fiber and drink lots of water. The goal is to increase motion in your intestinal track so you don’t become constipated and strain during bowel movements, which is the most common cause of hemorrhoid problems.

What exactly is a hemorrhoid?

Well, there are several different variations of hemorrhoids. The Mayo Clinic defines the 3 types of hemorrhoids as follows:

  • Internal hemorrhoids: These lie inside the rectum. You usually can’t see or feel these hemorrhoids, and they rarely cause discomfort. But straining or irritation when passing stool can damage a hemorrhoid’s surface and cause it to bleed.
  • External hemorrhoids: These are under the skin around your anus. When irritated, external hemorrhoids can itch or swell.
  • Thrombosed hemorrhoids: Sometimes blood may pool in an external hemorrhoid and form a clot (thrombus) that can result in severe pain, swelling, inflammation and a hard lump near your anus.

For symptoms of internal and external hemorrhoids, see the hemorrhoid section on our website at: https://coloradocolonandrectalspecialists.com/hemorrhoids-treatment/

As we have learned, cycling does not cause hemorrhoids but it certainly isn’t the best practice if you are currently experiencing them. Because cycling can irritate hemorrhoids and cause more pain and swelling in the affected area, you may have to take a break –just for a little bit– while your hemorrhoids subside. If halting your passion for a short time is not an option for you, we recommend you seek treatment for your hemorrhoids with Dr. Lisa Perryman. Call us at 303-840-8822 to schedule your appointment.

Even with hemorrhoids, we still recommend exercising. Maybe take a hike just not your bike.

Congratulations, it’s a GIRL… and a pregnancy Hemorrhoid!

Copyright © 2019, Gray Space www.grayspacefl.com.  Artist Debbie Draws Funny.

Growing a human being is undoubtedly a wonder, but for many women, it certainly has its downsides. When pregnant, there is a lot of commiserating about the ailments that come along with pregnancy; nausea, fatigue, weight gain, etc. Comparing stories about pregnancy and labor is a form of nostalgia for most women. The conversation usually ends with don’t worry, it is all worth it once you hold your beautiful baby. Although that may be true, we don’t tend to reminisce about pregnancy hemorrhoids. Who really likes to talk about their backsides anyway? Fortunately, here at Dr. Perryman’s office, we do. We know how important it is to maintain a healthy hiney! We talk about hemorrhoids on a daily basis and there is nothing to be embarrassed about. We all have butts and most likely you or someone you know has suffered hemorrhoids during pregnancy.

You are not alone!

Did you know that according to the NIH (National Institutes of Health) up to 35 percent of pregnant women will suffer from pregnancy hemorrhoids? During pregnancy, increased progesterone levels can cause constipation in expecting mothers, particularly in the 3rd trimester of pregnancy.  The increase in progesterone cause the walls of the veins to relax, which increases swelling.  This combination of constipation, swelling and a growing uterus adds pressure to the inferior vena cava and hemorrhoids can become a common and quite unpleasant side effect of pregnancy. During labor, all that pushing and pressure can also cause a hemorrhoid to flare up.  So, while giving birth is magical, it can also be a serious pain in the bottom.

If you experience painful bowel movements, swelling near your anus, notice blood in the toilet or when you wipe, you might have hemorrhoids.  It is important to note, however, that although hemorrhoids are usually the cause of rectal bleeding, it’s not the only cause. A board-certified colon & rectal medical doctor should be seen to properly diagnosis your condition.

What can you do to treat hemorrhoids during pregnancy?

Here are recommendations from the American Pregnancy Association that can potentially help reduce pregnancy hemorrhoid symptoms:

  • Increase your dietary fiber and liquid intake
  • Ask your physician about a stool softener
  • Stay active. Don’t sit for too long
  • Take a warm bath
  • Use witch hazel to reduce swelling or bleeding

If you are suffering from hemorrhoids after pregnancy, focus on these same measures to relieve your hemorrhoids, as well. These conservative methods can help alleviate symptoms in most patients. If the hemorrhoid symptoms persist, you should see a board certified colon and rectal specialist to prevent more serious complications like painful thrombosis and prolapse of the hemorrhoid.

For more information on hemorrhoid types and treatments, visit our Web site’s section on hemorrhoids at: https://coloradocolonandrectalspecialists.com/hemorrhoids-treatment/.

You just created life, you should be able to enjoy your own. Speak up, tell us about your hemorrhoids and also, congrats on that baby!