Screen This Too!

fb-profilepic-4October has become know for Breast Cancer Awareness Month, even sometimes being called ‘Pinktober’. During National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, the Colon Cancer Alliance’s Screen This Too campaign encourages people to remember the importance of colon health in addition to breast health. Get your colonoscopy. It could save your life!

Click here to learn more:

http://www.ccalliance.org/screenthistoo/index.html#sthash.zSVJ68JE.dpbs

Undy 5000 (5k run/1 mile walk)- Denver-June 28, 2014

Colorado Colon & Rectal Specialists is proud to say we are participating in the Denver Undy 5000! This is an event in support of colon cancer survivors and the loved ones that have been lost. Please join us at City Park this Saturday June 28, 2014. You can join our team “The Healthy Hiney” through this link: http://support.ccalliance.org/site/TR/5K/UndyNEW?fr_id=1941&pg=entry

Please see the attached letter to our patients for a discount code!

Undy 5000 patient letter

Undy 5000Last years Undy 5000!

Beers 4 Rears!!!

Colon cancer is the 3rd most commonly diagnosed cancer in the U.S., yet most people don’t talk about it. Colon cancer is preventable by getting routine colonoscopy screenings. There are currently more than 1 million colon cancer survivors in the United States. These statistics were taken from the American Cancer Society’s 2012 Cancer Facts & Figures.

Colorado Colon & Rectal Specialists is proud to announce that we are organizing a fundraiser to promote Colon Cancer Awareness which will help  fund local uninsured/under insured colon cancer screenings, and programs for patients undergoing colon/rectal/anal cancer treatments.  All proceeds from the event will be donated to the American Cancer Society- Relay for Life and the Colon Cancer Alliance- Undy 5000. Please join us for a fun evening of mingling at Dry Dock Brewing Company in Aurora, CO on Thursday June 12, 2014 from 5-8pm! For more information, please contact us at (303) 840- 8822.

Beers 4 rears flyer 3

 

Infrared Coagulation

Q&A: Regarding Infrared Coagulation (IRC)

What is Infrared Coagulation? IRC is a non-surgical hemorrhoid treatment that can be performed in the office without anesthesia. It is a technique used to shrink internal hemorrhoid tissue by applying a controlled amount of infrared energy to the hemorrhoid.

How does it work? IRC works by coagulating the vessels that provide the hemorrhoid with blood. This causes the hemorrhoid tissue to shrink back.

Does Dr. Perryman have experience performing IRC? Dr. Perryman does perform IRC in the office as well as other non-surgical treatments of hemorrhoids such as rubber band ligation (RBL), sclerotherapy, and medical management.

Is it painful? Many patients report feeling a heat sensation but do not feel pain. Patients can return to work the same day.

Is IRC an effective treatment? IRC has been shown to be an effective treatment in many patients. However, studies have shown that RBL demonstrates a greater long term efficacy. It is thought that this is because RBL causes the hemorrhoid tissue to die, where IRC creates a small burn that results in minimal tissue injury.

 

Dr. Perryman would be happy to further discuss treatment options with you.

Anal Fissure

An anal fissure is a small split or tear in the lining of the anal canal.  Anal fissures may be caused by constipation, the passing of large, hard stools, or by prolonged diarrhea.  An Anal fissure may occur secondary to decreased blood flow or trauma to the area.

Anal fissures are also common in women after childbirth and persons with Crohn’s disease.

Symptoms

An Anal fissure may cause painful bowel movements and bleeding. There may be blood on the outside of the stool or on the toilet tissue following a bowel movement.

Diagnosis and Treatment

To diagnose, your health care provider will perform a gentle inspection of the anus.

Home care treatments:

  • A diet high in fiber
  • Increased hydration
  • Numbing cream, if pain interferes with normal bowel movement
  • Warm sitz baths
  • Stool softeners

Physician treatments may involve:

  • Botox injections into muscle in the anus (anal sphincter)
  • Different prescription topical  medications
  • Surgery if the fissure fails to heal

Prevention

To prevent fissures:

  • Take a fiber supplement daily
  • Keep the anal area dry
  • Wipe with soft materials or a moistened cloth or cotton pad

 

Do I need a Colorectal Surgeon or a Gastroenterologist?

What is the difference between a colorectal surgeon and a gastroenterologist? This is a very common question that we receive and often patients are unsure of which field is appropriate for their needs. Although these fields overlap in some areas, the specialties are actually very different in the conditions they treat and their method of training. In order to address this issue, we have added some useful information to decide which type of physician treats your condition.

A Colorectal Surgeon, formerly known as a proctologist, is a general surgeon who has undergone further training in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the colon, rectum and anus. Colon and rectal surgeons are experts in the surgical and non-surgical treatment of colon and rectal problems. Colon and rectal surgeons treat benign and malignant conditions, perform routine colon screening examinations and surgically treat problems when necessary.

A colorectal surgeon will evaluate, diagnose and treat the following symptoms and conditions:

Anal Abscess/Fistula Anal Cancer Anal Fissure
Anal Pain Anal Warts Bowel Incontinence
Colorectal Cancer Constipation Crohn’s Disease
Diverticular Disease Hemorrhoids Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Pelvic Floor Dysfunction Pilonidal Disease Pruritus Ani
Rectal Prolapse Rectocele Ulcerative Colitis

A gastroenterologist is a doctor who has completed initial training in internal medicine and further training in gastroenterology. Gastroenterologists do not operate on patients. A gastroenterologist specializes in diseases of the digestive system (gastrointestinal (GI) tract). Gastroenterologists diagnose and treat many conditions that affect the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine (colon), and biliary system (e.g., liver, pancreas, gallbladder, bile ducts).

 

 

Fixed Price Colonoscopy

Dr. Perryman participates with Parker Adventist Hospital in the fixed price colonoscopy program. Fixed price colonoscopies are for patients who do not have insurance coverage. There is a set fee of $1,000.00 which covers all expenses related to the procedure. Please call our office at 303-840-8822 if you need any further information or want to schedule.

What is a virtual colonoscopy

What is a virtual colonoscopy?

A virtual colonoscopy is different from a regular colonoscopy. The virtual colonoscopy is performed in the radiology department of a hospital or medical center. No sedatives are needed and no scope is used. You will lie on your left side on a narrow table that is connected to a CT scan machine.

  • A small, flexible tube will be inserted into your rectum. Air is pumped through the tube to make the colon bigger and easier to see. Pumping air into the colon can create cramping or gas pains.
  • After this is done, you’ll be asked to lie on your back as the table slides into a large tunnel through the machine, where x-rays create images of your colon.

A regular colonoscopy may also need to be done (on a different day) after a virtual colonoscopy if:

  • No cause for bleeding or other symptoms were found. Virtual colonoscopy can miss some smaller problems in the colon.
  • Biopsy or polyp removal is needed.

Your doctor will most likely recommend a conventional colonoscopy instead of a virtual colonoscopy for the majority of patients. The reason is that virtual colonoscopy does not allow the doctor to remove tissue samples or polyps. This is important because some polyps can be precancerous and must be removed to eliminate the possibility of turning into cancer. In addition to removing polyps, your doctor may want to take additional biopsies to rule out certain conditions in conjunction with symptoms you experience. This can only be done with a conventional colonoscopy.

How to prepare for either test

Everyone undergoing any type of colonoscopy, virtual or traditional, must completely empty their bowels before the exam. Both tests require a bowel prep and clear liquid diet, specified by your doctor.

Risks for a virtual colonoscopy

  • Radiation exposure. The risk of radiation exposure remains uncertain, although it is significantly lower radiation than one is exposed to during standard CT scans.
  • The medications to prepare for the test can cause nausea, vomiting, bloating, or rectal irritation.

Considerations

Differences between virtual and conventional colonoscopy include:

  • Virtual colonoscopy uses no sedation, and patients are usually able to go back to their normal activities right away after the test. Conventional colonoscopy involves sedation, and usually the loss of a work day.
  • Conventional colonoscopy uses the same prep as a virtual and allows for biopsies at the time of the procedure, thus no need for patient to repeat prep and have a 2nd procedure if something abnormal is found on the virtual colonoscopy.
  • Conventional colonoscopy has a lesser margin for missing smaller problems in the colon.
  • Screening conventional colonoscopy generally covered by most insurance companies at 100%.
  • Virtual colonoscopies may not be covered by insurance and can be a very expensive out of pocket cost for a patient.
  • Not all medical facilities are currently performing virtual colonoscopies.

Rectal Bleeding

The most common misconception about rectal bleeding is that it is coming from hemorrhoids.

Hemorrhoids can be the cause of rectal bleeding; however, there are many other conditions that can cause rectal bleeding. These conditions include but are not limited to, colon cancer/rectal cancer, anal fissures, constipation, polyp(s), and Inflammatory Bowel Disease, such as Crohn’s and Ulcerative colitis. Please visit this link to see all causes of rectal bleeding http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/rectal-bleeding/MY00573/DSECTION=causes.

To determine the source of rectal bleeding, an anorectal exam should be performed by a qualified provider as well as a colonoscopy. Doing both of these procedures will allow Dr. Perryman to diagnose the source of the bleeding and determine treatment. 

WEBCAST

 Colorectal Cancer and Digestive Health Awareness Webcast  

 

Click here for more information 

 

Be sure to click the link above and join in on March 28th as The American Society of Colon & Rectal Surgeons answer your questions about the importance of early detection and provide information on treatment options.